Are worldbuilding focused novels harder to write or no?

Let’s say you are writing a high fantasy or science-fiction novel that requires plenty of worldbuilding. The worldbuilding in your story is the main focus yet the characters and plot aren’t entirely excluded from the story. It is just the characters and plot revolves around world’s setting and more.

Are novels like these harder to do? Does this require extensive researching and reading of the types of books(silly question so forgive me)?

Do any of you know any fiction novels where the worldbuilding is the main focus? It writing such a book possible or makes sense?

Any more questions, please ask me and I will do my best to answer them.
Goodbye for now!

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Technically, Cannery Row fits this description, the problem is that it is very not Fantasy.

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Never heard of it. I am so sorry.

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D&Dbooks.

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Isn’t John Steinbeck the same author who wrote Of Mice and Men or something like that?

Or is that some other person?

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I think it’s the same author.

I’d reccomend to make something like Cannery Row for a worldbuilding focused novel.

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Ah, alrighty then.

Does reading certain nonfiction writing help books also make it work?
(I worded that wrong and I do apologize.)

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That would make sense.

Wait, by D&D do you mean Dungeons and Dragons?

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Yeah. Each book for their roleplaying is strictly worldbuilding. I was writing. a book in a similar manner that I need to pick back up but that’s some friggen research.

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Yeah, that would require a SHIT ton of research. However, I have all the time in the world to focus on researching, jotting down notes, and writing chapters plus more.

I want to be ready. NO! I am ready to start.

Some people really like it and spend years with maps and world setting. I think the only books that really hit it big with that kind of attitude did it back before 1990s. Nowadays, it just feels boring to read, because of the endless copycats of Tolkien that try to do it quick and dirty, and all end up with basically the same kind of stuff, different only in the names they invented for their pantheons or houses.

A good setting doesn’t need to be extensive. It needs to be plausible, has internal conflict, emotional grab… setting is not just a list of places, landscapes, cities, populations, traditions, languages… basically, it is not a DnD setting book.

The hardest novels to write are the ones that grip the reader.

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Hmm…

That makes sense. I mean I am no Tolkien and I can’t hope to ever be, but I am really fond of the idea of the world that I have for my story. I really more focused on that then the plot and characters sad to say. Yet I totally get what you mean when you mention that it would be considered boring these days.

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It’s good that you are attached to it, but it’s your characters, their struggles and how much they belong in the world you create that makes the world into a place one doesn’t want to live, like the successful IPs.

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Understandable. It is just so damn frustrating trying to figure out what my characters’ wants, needs, and goals are in the story. I am so concern about the world that it is tough finding a character(s) that I can mold into that world I’ve created. I am really struggling to place characters into the world of Alterra(my fictional world). The same applies to the plot. So, much is happening history and myth wise pertaining to the story that it is challenging.

Anyway, I am still thinking about what I can do.
It’s just complicated to me.

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It’s not an easy task for anyone. But start with a character you are totally in love with and see where it leads you. Or, if all else fails, do an outsider.

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Oh boy! I actually have a crap ton of characters with backstories that I find interesting. Now, it is a matter of selecting one. Doesn’t help that I have an entire list of male and female names for fictional characters typed out with another one that I am working on. That list alone has over two hundred names. Some of the characters I had to try to get creative for their backstories and what not. Still, it was a bit hard.

Not to sound like I am complaining or anything, I may have to narrow it down to people who I can choose for the story. It’s funny how I find worldbuilding more enjoyable when that requires the most work in my opinion. LOL!

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Chose the character who needs to change the most and should realize that they are currently hurting someone by their behaviour. They are usually the best bet for protagonists.

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Ah, I see.

A character that can change and grow overtime, but at the same time their actions are affecting the other characters. That is the type of protagonist I should focus on?

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