Indian Dressing culture - a brief guide

A little about
Indian Dressing Culture!

Some types of traditional dresses

DIFFERENT TYPES OF TRADITIONAL DRESSES IN INDIA, AND SOME OF THEIR SUBTYPES AND ORIGINS.

A LEHENGA / GHAGRA IS A TRADITIONAL DRESS ORIGINATING FROM THE NORTHERN PARTS OF THE COUNTRY THAT GOT ITS MOST SIGNIFICANT PUSH DURING THE MUGHAL RULE. IT IS,FOR THAT REASON, ASSOCIATED WITH MUSLIMS IN A HISTORICAL CONTEXT. HOWEVER, THAT IS NO LONGER TRUE AS IT IS A VERY COMMON DRESS AMONG THE YOUNG GENERATIONS. IT IS A THREE-PIECE DRESS CONSISTING OF A SKIRT (CALLED LEHENGA), WHICH IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART OF THE DRESS, BLOUSE AND CHOLI (IN HINDI) OR ODHNI (IN MARATHI).

BRIDAL LEHENGA:

bridal lehenga

CASUAL LEHENGA:

casual lehenga

A PUNJABI DRESS IS JUST THAT - A DRESS ORIGINATING FROM PUNJAB. BECAUSE OF ITS ORIGIN, IT IS ASSOCIATED WITH SIKH CULTURE, THOUGH IT IS NOW A POPULAR HOUSEHOLD DRESS FOR WOMEN, THOUGH NOT USUALLY WORN AT VERY FORMAL OR VERY FUNCTIONAL EVENTS. BUT IT CAN BE, DEPENDING UPON HOW FANCY IT IS. THESE ARE THREE PIECE DRESSES, TOO, BUT INSTEAD OF A SKIRT, WE HAVE PANTS. THE CHOLI FOR THESE ISN’T CALLED CHOLI IN HINDI, IT’S A DUPATTA. ONLY IN CONTEXT OF LEHANGA, THE TERM ‘CHOLI’ IS USED. THE STYLE OF THE PANTS CAN DIVIDE THIS INTO TWO MORE TYPES. A SALWAR-KAMEEZ HAS PANTS WHICH ARE ESSENTIALLY LEGGINGS WITH PLEATS THAT BEGIN FROM THE ANKLE. THIS CAN BE WORN TO FUNCTIONS, SOMETIMES. PALAZZO PANTS/ PANTS WHICH DON’T MUCH HUG THE SKIN ANYWHERE ARE GENERALLY TERMED AS PALAZZOS. SIMPLY CALLED PUNJABI DRESSES ARE ONES WITH PANTS THAT FLARE IN THE MIDDLE. THESE DISTINCTIONS ARE NOT HARD AND FAST, JUST COMMONLY USED TERMS. A LOT OF THIS MIGHT ALSO BE SUBJECTIVE BASED ON WHAT I HAVE HEARD AND EXPERIENCED FROM THE PEOPLE AROUND ME. THESE TERMS ALSO GET INTERMIXED A LOT. SO A SALWAR AND A NORMAL PUNJABI DRESS MIGHT BE MIXED UP OR SO ON.

SIMPLE PUNJABI DRESS (NOTICE THE SPECIAL FLARE OF THE PANTS):

simple Punjabi dress

SALWAR-KAMEEZ (A FANCY VERSION THAT CAN BE WORN TO PARTIES):

fancy salwar

FANCY PALAZZO PUNJABI:

fancy palazzo punjabi

AN ANARKALI IS ANOTHER THREE PIECE DRESS STYLE ASSOCIATED WITH MUSLIMS HISTORICALLY, BUT NOW FAVORED BY ALL INDIAN YOUTH. IT CONSISTS OF A FROCK, USUALLY LITTLE LESS THAN ANKLE LENGTH AND A LEGGINGS OR A PALAZZO WORN BELOW IT, AND SOMETIMES AN ODHNI / DHUPATTA, BUT THE ODHNI IS OPTIONAL. THE PALAZZO IS A CONCEPT THAT HAS EVOLVED VERY RECENTLY AND IS NOW A TREND, IN THE CASE OF BOTH ANARKALIS AND PUNJABIS. THIS IS BOTH FUNCTIONAL AND CASUAL, DEPENDING UPON HOW DETAILED THE DESIGN IS, LIKE LEHENGA.

BRIDAL ANARKALI:

bridal anarkali

FANCY ANARKALI:

fancy anarkali

DAILYWEAR ANARKALI:

dailywear anarkali

AFTER READING ALL THIS, YOU ASK, WHAT IS THIS ODHNI / DUPATTA / CHOLI YOU MENTION CONSTANTLY? HERE:

odhni / dupatta / choli

THE LONG CLOTH ON HER HANDS IS CALLED AN ODHNI (MARATHI) OR DUPATTA (HINDI) OR CHOLI (MOSTLY IN CONTEXT OF lehenga)


this is by no means an exhaustive or comprehensive list. I will keep adding to this as and when I get time, but there is a lot more intermingling and sifting culture in traditional dresses and their historical context. New styles are made and trends are set every day. I encourage you to do your research, too!


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* coded by val *

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Yay, I see it!

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Wow, these outfits are gorgeous! But aren’t they kind of hot for the weather in India? I know we couldn’t wear anything like those in Florida, even with air conditioning. (♯^.^ღ)

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Maybe the material combats that?

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Or they have electic fans built in underneath! (◠‿◠) (◠‿◠✿)

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They are actually mostly comfortable. Besides they are mostly for functions and festivals. Day to day clothes are not quite like that. Also people wear western clothes too.

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Ah! Western clothes like shorts and t-shirts? (*^-‘) 乃

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Yeah. Shorts, tshirts, skirts, tops many more.

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this has nothing to do with the thread xD but i think you should reduce your text shadow - it’s kinda difficult to read the text :sweat_smile:

screenshot

pic

also, you might want to use overflow - the thread’s reallyy long, but it’s up to you! these are just my two cents :)

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Thank you! I love them!

Oh they are! A lot of them are! They’re just worn for functions nowadays, like @Tiya says. But thhe did wear these regularly in the past.

Not really. But you’ve just given me another research topic to add to this thread!

LOL I wish. I mean, electric fans are beyond common in India and it was culture shock to see they aren’t a thing in France, but we don’t have fans on dresses :laughing:

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Ahhh thanks! No idea how I missed it! How come the text shadow is so weird on the ss? It shows up just fine on my laptop and phone…

image

Oh yes. I didn’t get how exactly to restrict box-size, tho…

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I think it’s because I’m on light mode, so your text, assuming you never set the color, will appear black for me. Also, for overflow, use this code:

height: xpx; overflow: scroll;

replace x with a value of your choice :slight_smile: hope this helps!

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Oh yes. Sorry, forgot to make it light-mode friendly.

Ah thanks! Fixed it up (I used percentages because I want to keep this mobile-friendly, but yeah!)

It should look better and more digestible, now.

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percentage for height on mobile doesn’t effect responsiveness from what I’ve seen xD - it’s only for width - but you do you! and it does!

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Oop- wait yes. Thanks! I’m very new ot this coding stuff, so thanks for the help!

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no problem!

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Will come back with new styles today or tomorrow!

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You forgot one very popular one-
Saris~
image

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Yup, it’s coming. That what I have planned for today. Sarees and at least three of their sub types with a list of the rest which I would cover slowly!

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This fine day we are covering Sarees / Saris !

A saree is one of the most popular dress in India, and the one worn most widely. It is another three piece dress (most dresses are three piece dresses here) consisting of a blouse, which is a special kind of shirt, a “parkar” which is an underskirt, and a long piece of cloth - like 6 or 9 meters long, that is draped over the body. The most important feature of sarees is the way it is draped, which changes from region to region, along with fabric and style. Historically, Sarees were the staple dress of Indians almost all over the continent, and are still worn all day long by lots of people, not just for functions.

A “normal” saree is a six-foot long cloth that comes in different fabrics including silk, nets etc. This is wrapped around the parkar and then pleated and tucked at the centre of your waist and then wrapped for another half turn before being pleated again and draped over the wearer’s shoulder. These sarees are most common for daily-wear and are nowadays coming in many different prints, digital print being most common as it is light and airy and fashionable.
The pleats are called ‘mire’ (pronounced me-rey) (marathi), the part draped over your shoulder (which may or may not have even more fancy design) is called ‘padar’ and the edges of the saree (which have an inner linen for durability) is called ‘katha.’ These terminologies are important for when we come across another type of saree. The linen inside and the special kind of stiches used to attach it to the saree are collectively called ‘pico-fall.’ You never wear a saree without the pico-fall done, i.e. attached. You cannot do this at home as it requires a special type of sewing machine.

Daily wear Saree:
saree

Fancy saree:
fancy saree
(pay special attention to the golden edges - katha, and how the end of the cloth around over her shoulder is of the same gold- padar)

Bridal saree:
bridal saree

Now for the marathi style of saree, which is my native. This is a nine meters long / nine yards long cloth saree, called a nauwari (originating from the marathi words nau - nine). This saree is the same as the six yard saree, mostly, except at the bottom, it is tucked both back and front with mire so that it resembles pants or breeches. This is considered one of the most comfortable saree variants, but its influence is now dwindling. No one wears this daily except great-grand parents anymore, and few wear this even to functions. Even resident born and brought up Maharashtrians (those of us who speak marathi and are born in Maharashtra- where this style is from) usually do not know how to drape one. This is a very functional saree, now.

This is the closest I could find to a dailywear nauwari, because they are no longer used so much.
dailywear nauwari

Functional nauwari
nauwari

We will cover more types of sarees in later posts!

*coded by val*
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